Bogan-Pfahler-Kehrer-Reber-Volkmer

Henry JohnsonAge: 74 years17771852

Name
Henry Johnson
Given names
Henry
Surname
Johnson
Birth February 4, 1777 37 33
Birth of a brotherGriffith Johnson
August 11, 1778 (Age 18 months)
Birth of a sisterSarah Ann Johnson
1780 (Age 2 years)
Birth of a sisterMary Johnson
about 1782 (Age 4 years)
Birth of a sisterNancy Johnson
about 1784 (Age 6 years)
Death of a paternal grandfatherWilliam Johnson
1785 (Age 7 years)
Occupation
Methodist Preacher, Mayor , Author
about 1802 (Age 24 years)
Note: Organized the first Methodist Church in Harrison County.
Death of a motherCatherine Demoss
1815 (Age 37 years)
Marriage of a parentJames JohnsonJemina GriffinView this family
August 22, 1816 (Age 39 years)
Marriage of a parentJames JohnsonEleanor MowderView this family
March 29, 1820 (Age 43 years)
Death of a fatherJames Johnson
1849 (Age 71 years)
Death of a brotherJohn Johnson
before 1851 (Age 73 years)
Death after 1852 (Age 74 years)
Burial
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: about 1764Virginia
3 years
elder brother
3 years
elder sister
3 years
elder sister
3 years
elder brother
3 years
elder brother
John Johnson
Birth: September 1775 35 32Westmoreland Co, PA
Death: before 1851Monroe Co, OH
9 months
elder brother
Andrew William Johnson
Birth: May 26, 1776 36 32Westmoreland Co, PA
Death: January 17, 1855Short Creek Twp, Harrison Co, OH
8 months
himself
Henry Johnson
Birth: February 4, 1777 37 33Westmoreland Co, PA
Death: after 1852Antioch, Monroe Co, OH
18 months
younger brother
2 years
younger sister
3 years
younger sister
3 years
younger sister
Father’s family with Ann McMillian - View this family
father
step-mother
Marriage: about 1758
half-brother
half-brother
half-brother
Father’s family with Eleanor Mowder - View this family
father
step-mother
Marriage: March 29, 1820Harrison Co, Ohio
Father’s family with Jemina Griffin - View this family
father
step-mother
Marriage: August 22, 1816Harrison Co, Ohio

Occupation

Organized the first Methodist Church in Harrison County. First mayor of Woodsfield in Monroe County, OH Author and Historian.

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The following is a copy of a story about the Johnsons written by Henry Johnson

1788 THE JOHNSON BOYS

ALL who have read anything of western history, will remember the thrilling feat of the two Johnson boys. As many very contradictory accounts have been given of that Occurrence, which so links their name with the heroic age of the west, we were anxious to procure the fullfacts and for this purpose eonsulted the surviving brother, now a hale old man of seventy-four, living in Monroe county, Ohio. In answer to our inquiry, he has written out a detailed statement of the whole transaction, which it affords us sincere pleasure to herewith submit:

ANTIOCH, MONROE COUNTY, Ohio January 18th, 1851

DEAR SIR:-Yours of the 8th instant has just come to hand, and I with pleasure sit down to answer your request, which is a statement of my adventure with tke Indians. I was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, February 4th, 1777. When about eight years old, my father, James Johnson, having a large family to provide for, his farm, with the expectation of acquiring larger possessions further west. Thus be was stimulated to encounter the perils of a pioneer life. He crossed the Ohio river, and bought some improvements on what was called Beach Bottom Flats, two and a half miles from the river, and three or four miles above the mouth of Short creek, with the expectation of holding by improvement right under the Virginia claim. Soon after we reached there, the Indians became troublesome; they stole horses, and killed a number of persons in our neighborhood. When I was between eleven and twelve years old, in the month of October, 1788, I was taken prisoner by the Indians, with my brother John, who was about eighteen months older than I. The circumstances were as follows: On Saturday evening, we were out with an older brother, and came home late in the evening. The next morning one of us had lost a hat, and about the middle of the day, we thought that perhaps we had left it where we bad been at work, about three- fourths of a mile from the house. We went to the place and found the hat, and sat down on a log by the road-side, and commenced cracking nuts. In a short time we saw two men coming toward us from the house. By their dress, we supposed they were two of our neighbors, James Perdue and J. Russell. We paid but little attention to them, until they came quite near us, when we saw our mistake: they were black. To escape by flight was impossible, had we been dis- posed to try. We sat still until they came up. One or them said, "How do, brodder?" My brother asked them if they were Indians, and they answered in the affirmative, and said we must go with them. One of them had a blue buckskin pouch, which we gave my brother to carry, and without further ceremony, be took up the line of march tbr the wilderness, not knowing whether we should ever return to our cheerful home; and not having much love for our commanding officers, of course we obeyed orders rather tardily. The mode of march was thus-one of the Indians walked about ten steps before, the other about ten behind us. After travelling some distance, we halted in a deep hollow and sat down. They took out their knives and whet them, and talked some time in the Indian tongue, which we could not understand. My brother and me sat eight or ten steps from them, and talked about killing them that night, and make our escape. I thought from their looks and actions, that they were going to kill us; and, strange to say, I felt no alarm. I thought I wouhd rather die than go with them. The most of my trouble was, that my facher and mother would be freting after us-not knowing what had become of us. I expressed my thoughts to John, who went and began to talk with them. He said that father was cross to him, and made him work hard, and that he did not like hard work; that he would rather be a hmtter, and live in the woods. This seemed to please them; for they put up there knives, and talked more lively and pleasantly. We became very familiar, and many questions passed between us; all parties were very inquisitive. They asked my brother which way home was, several times, and he would tcll them the contrary way every time, although he knew the way very well. This wouhd make them laugh; they thought we were lost, and that we knew no better. They conducted us over the Short creek hills in search of horses, but found none; so we continued on foot until night, when we halted in hollow, about three miles from Carpenter's fort, and about four from the place where they first took us; our route being somewhat circuitous, we made but slow progress. As night began to close in, I became fretful. My brother encouraged me, by whispering that we would kill them that night. After they had selected the place of our encampment, one of them scouted round, whilst the other struck fire, which was done by stopping the touch-hole of his gun, and fiashing powder in the pan. After the Indian got the fire kindled, he reprimed the gun and went to an old stump, to get some tinder wood, and while he was thus employed, my brother John took the gun, cocked it, and was about to shoot the Indian: alarmed lest the other might be close by, I remonstrated, and taking hold of the gun, prevented him shooting; at the same time I begged him to wait till night, and I would help him kill them both. The other Indian came back about dark, when we took our supper, such as it was,-some corn parched on the coals, and some roasted pork. We then sat and talked for some time. They seemed to be acquainted with the whole border settlemeat, from Marietta to Beaver, and could number every fort and block-house, and asked my brother how many fighting men there were in each place, and how many guns. In some places, my brother said, there were a good many more guns than there were fighting men. They asked what use were these guns. He said the women could load while the men fired. But how did these guns get there? My brother said, when tile war was over with Great Britain, the soldiers that were enlisted during the war were discharged, and they left a great many of their guns at the stations. They asked my brother who owned that black horse that wore a bell? He answered, father. They then said the Indians could never catch titat horse. We then went to bed on the naked ground, to rest and study out the best mode of attack. They put us between them, that tltcy might bc the better able to guard us. After awhile, one of the Indians; supposing we were asleep, got up and stretched himself on the other side of the fire, and soon began to snore. John, who had been watching every motion, found they were sound asleep. He whispered to me to get up, which we did as carefully as possible. John took the gun with which the Indian had struck fire cocked it, and placed it in the direction of the head of one of tlte Indians. He then took a tomahawk, and drew it over tile head of the other htdian. I pulled the trigger, and he struck at the same instant; the blow falling too far back on the neck, only stunned the Indian. He attempted to spring to his feet, uttering the most hideous yells, but my brother repeated the blows with such effect that the conflict became terrible, and somewhat doubtful. The Indian, however, was forced to yield to the blows he received on his head, and in a short time he lay quiet at our feet. The one that was shot never moved; and fearing there were others close by, we hurried off, and took nothing with us but the gun I shot with. They had told us we would see Indians about to-morrow, so we thought that there was a camp of Indians close by; and fearing the report of the gun, the Indian halloowing, and I calling to John, might bring them upon us, we took our course towards the river, and on going about three-fourths of a mile, came to a path which led to Carpenter's fort. My brother here hung up his hat that he might know where to take off to find the camp. We got to the fort a little before daybreak. We related our adventure, and the next day a small party went out with my brother, and found the Indian that was tomahawked, on the ground; the other had crawled off, and was not found till some time after. He was shot through close by the car. Having concluded this narrative, I will give a description of the two Indians. They were of the Delaware tribe, and one of them a chief. He wore the badges of his office-the wampum belt, three half-moons, and a silver plate on his breast; bands of silver on both arms, and his ears cut round and ornamcnted with silver; tire hair on the top of his head was done up with silver wire. The other Indian seemed to be a kind of waiter. Ile was rather under size, a plain man. He wore a fine beaver hat, with a hole shot through the crown. My brother asked him about the hat. He said he killed a captain and got his hat. My brother asked him if he had killed many of the whites, and he answered, a good many. He then asked him if the big Indian had killed many of the whites, and he answered, a great many, and that he was a great captain--a chief.

Signed: Henry Johnson

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(Research):References: History of the Early Settlement and Indian Wars Our Western Border by McKnight West Virginia Archives